Must-Reads Of The Week From Brianna Labuskes

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Newsletter editor Brianna Labuskes wades through hundreds of health care policy stories each week, so you don’t have to.

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Viewpoints: Lessons On Getting Over-The-Top Prices On Life-Saving Drugs Under Control; Breakthrough For Alzheimer’s? Look At The Confusion

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Opinion writers weigh in on curbing the costs of pharmaceuticals and other issues.

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Longer Looks: The Psychology Of Voting; Overexcited Neurons And Artificial Intelligence; And More

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Each week, KHN finds interesting reads from around the Web.

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State Highlights: Texas Has Highest Rate Of Uninsured Women Of Child-Bearing Age. Look At Death Rates; Parents Sue Troubled Hospital In North Carolina Over Child’s Death

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Media outlets report on news from Texas, North Carolina, Connecticut, California, Minnesota, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, and Missouri.

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Mental Health Institutions, Playgrounds, And Dozens More: Va. Governor Vows To Eliminate Racist Laws Still On Books

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

A task force assembled by Gov. Ralph Northam several months after a racist photo of him was found in his medical school yearbook recommended removing nearly 100 overtly discriminatory and racist laws still on the books.

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Nearly One In Three High School Students Admit To Using At Least One Type Of Tobacco Product Recently

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Public health officials are concerned that despite wide-scale publicity intended to deter vaping, especially in the wake of recent illnesses and deaths, not only did the practice continue to surge, but students also did not seem to be particularly alarmed about e-cigarettes. What's more is that students also reported using other nicotine products, revealing a widespread problem with addiction not limited to just vaping. Meanwhile, a tale of two states shows the effects of what happens when there's a vaping ban in one.

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New Concepts About Mental Health Of Vets: Bad War Experiences Might Not Be What’s Leading To So Many Suicides

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Army-funded studies report there is a significant and growing proportion of soldiers entering the military with psychiatric disorders, requiring wider availability of mental health care for troops, even those who have never experienced combat. Public health news is on studies on dangers of PFAS, aging, face injuries from cellphones, time-restricted eating, postpartum depression among women of color, measles' steady comeback, raising boys these days, diabetes risks for preemies, and traumas brought on by patients, as well.

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Medicare Advisory Commission Deems Payments To Ambulatory Surgical Centers As Already High Enough

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

Eliminating the increase would produce cost savings for Medicare without hurting access to care or the willingness of ambulatory surgical centers to deliver services to Medicare beneficiaries, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission ruled. In other news, Saturday is the deadline for Medicare enrollment, but some advocates are calling for flexibility because of the difficulties some beneficiaries have encountered while trying to sign up.

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Tufts University Latest Organization To Distance Itself From Sackler Family Following Opioid Crisis Fallout

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

“Our students find it objectionable to walk into a building that says Sackler on it when they come in here to get their medical education,” said Dr. Harris A. Berman, the dean of the Tufts University School of Medicine. Tufts won't return the money Sackler has donated over the years, but will instead set up an endowment to help combat the epidemic.

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Supreme Court’s Question Of The Day: Does The Constitution Give Homeless The Right To Sleep On Sidewalks?

Posted on Dec 06, 2019

The ruling from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals says so long as there is no option of sleeping indoors, the government cannot criminalize indigent, homeless people for sleeping outdoors on public property. But dissenters say the decision shackles the hands of law enforcement who are trying to deal with an escalating homeless crisis.

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